Archive for April, 2011

Toshiba releases new hard drive that erases itself when removed from a PC

April 15, 2011

Toshiba has come up with a type of self-encrypting hard drive (SED) that can automatically wipe data if it is removed from a paired computer by an attacker.

Available in capacities up to 640GB, the new MKxx61GSYG drive upgrades the capabilities of an identically named drive announced last December, which launched the company’s family of drives complying with the Trusted Computing Group’s Opal SSC specification.

The new version adds new feature to the mix for OEMs, including the ability to cause either part or all of the drive to become crypto-erased if the drive detects that it is not operating inside a particular PC.

According to Toshiba, this is useful for point-of-sale terminals as well as some laptops to protect against drive data being accessed when it is at the end of its life or being re-provisioned.

The company is also pushing the case of this type of drive in niche applications such as multi-function printers that cache and retain images of faxes and printed documents. Undoubtedly, however, the technology could herald a move towards drives that are designed to wipe themselves out when removed from paired computers or devices.

It’s important to also note that data can also be set to erase from sections of the drive based on remote commands.

SAS and EMC push High Performance Analytics technology

April 14, 2011

On Tuesday, EMC added three new models to its Greenplum Data Computing Appliance (DCA) line of products, including a system optimized for high-capacity and another optimized for high performance. The company also rolled out version 4.1 of the Greenplum Database.

Separately on Tuesday, SAS Institute said its SAS High-Performance Analytics technology will be added to EMC’s DCA products.

By adding the SAS technology, Greenplum users will soon be able to perform complex analytical computations on their data without having to first move it to a SAS environment.

James Kobielus of Forrester Research said, “The SAS integration is very important for EMC Greenplum at a number of levels. Customers of data warehousing solutions are looking more and more to run advanced analytics without necessarily having to move their data to specialized platform such as SAS.”

The integration of the two environments will let Greenplum users take advantage of their massively parallel, high-performance data warehouse appliances to run SAS analytics significantly faster.

Greenplum customers can now select SAS more easily because they don’t have to move their data out from one environment to another. Greenplum customers are clearly getting some analytics capabilities they didn’t have previously.

If SAS did not partner with EMC they would have had hard time surviving if the only way they work is to take data out of DB2 or Teradata or Greenplum and put it into SAS.  Data volumes are getting increasingly massive and a lot of data is simply not going to be in SAS going forward.

This is a very good move for SAS and EMC.

Cloud computing can be a time saver…..

April 12, 2011

Businesses and organizations of all sizes and orientation are undergoing a massive shift in how they acquire IT services and solutions. Today, provisioning new applications and services can be a complex design and integration exercise, with the business itself having to bear the risk and burden of the deployment. More and more, CIOs are looking for simplified approaches like Cloud services and managed services relationships that enable them to focus on their core business.

On average the typical IT department spends 70% of its budget on maintaining its existing infrastructure and only 30% on innovation to generate a competitive advantage for the business. The biggest challenge CIOs face is the need to react much faster to business demands and to get ahead of the curve toward using IT as a competitive differentiator.

While cloud computing adoption has been swift among startups and small-to-midsize businesses with little or no legacy IT operations, larger enterprises have been slower to adopt cloud-related services. Selecting the right providers and services is a gamble when products, pricing and performance change daily. Also, companies that have large capital investments in custom software or infrastructure can find it difficult to make a case for scrapping it all. Then there are the issues of integration, standardization, security and control.

But when the time is right, the cloud can be the way to grow, no matter the size of the enterprise. Not only can software as a service (SaaS), infrastructure as a service (IaaS), and platform as a service (PaaS) be fast and relatively cheap enablers of corporate growth, they can enable IT groups to serve the expanding enterprise more strategically. The cloud allows IT organizations to focus its efforts on improvement and innovation.